Buses and Automobiles

Thirty years ago, I was introduced to a guy at a party who said he was a writer.  Reader, I married him. His non-fiction sketch, Bus Portraits, got published this morning by X-R-A-Y Literary Magazine. The physicality  of this piece knocks me out. And yes, it does belong on a blog about disability.

Tom Grogan, a writer in my Tuesday workshop, recently wrote an eloquent essay about the pain and loss he felt when he gave up driving. It was published by the Cincinnati Enquirer.

As far as I know, the two men have never shared a bus ride together.

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An App for That?

This wide and wonderful planet is not as handicapped accessible as it could be. Which leads to all sorts of conundrums for travelers who are in wheelchairs, or on crutches, or who just have to pee—now.

Is there an app for locating free, clean, accessible bathrooms? I want one. Until that day, I will simply follow the Golden Arches.  Gas station restrooms can be dicey. Highway rest areas are, in my mind, the pinnacle of civilization, but are prone to closure during state budget cuts. Which bring me back to McDonald’s. Again, and again, and again. Specials shout outs to the McDonald’s by the Arc de Triomphe and the McDonald’s in Waimea. Home is where they have to let you in.

I have another request of the App Gods. I want an interactive, updatable app to alert travelers with disabilities of situations like this:

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I was shocked, as was the lady in the photo above, to see that the elevator was out at the Metro Station at the NIH (National Institutes of Health), of all places. We’d been lulled into the feeling that we’d reached Oz and all of our problems were about to be solved. And now this. While believe I pointed the young woman in the direction of a working elevator, that could have been wishful thinking. The sun had just burst out from under a cloud, raising my body temperature, frying my neurological wires. So I was distracted. I had to pee. But in my distraction, I did wonder: why couldn’t Google Maps have a little alert that the elevator was out, saving this lady the effort it took to get here…and a little flag indicating the location of the next closest elevator? And that’s when my app idea was conceived. It’s still not fully formed.

Is this app a layer on existing apps that a disabled user can opt into?

Or is this a separate app? I know I love to read blogs about other people’s (mis)adventures traveling with MS, like the Xanax tinged travails of MSGracefulNot.   Wouldn’t it be nice if all the testimonials were in one place? That’s what the fine blog The MS Wire has attempted to do. Ed Tobias has compiled travel tips from his years of adventures, and has invited his readers to do the same. He’s started with some practical tips about traveling New York, with the hope of adding more cities in the future. It would be great to have folks check in from Ontario and Topeka or their own home town, with their praises of well tended sidewalks and/or their condemnations of doors within hospitals that can’t be opened without buttons. (Major pet peeve!) It would be great, on entering a new city, to have the dirt on the dirty bathrooms (I know, I know, I’m obsessed with bathrooms) and broken elevators from people who get it. It would be great to have travel anxieties dispelled by the knowledge that our peers have our backs.

Thank you for reading!

If you haven’t already, consider voting for my blog at the WEGOHealthAwards.

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If This Callus Could Talk

I was moving my index finger back and forth from the tip of  Dr. W’s index finger to the tip of my nose—a rote task in a neurological exam—when Dr. W. caught my right wrist and asked, “What’s the story behind this?”

There was a callus between my thumb and forefinger.  “I got that kayaking.”

The story of the kayak trip is more than the story behind the callus. It’s the story behind my marriage. That’s my husband’s take on it, anyway.

The weekend before our twenty seventh anniversary, my husband and I decided to venture out to the west side of Cincinnati to kayak. We decided against the familiar lakes, with their predictable views, and opted instead to rent from an unfamiliar kayak outfit on the Miami River. Perhaps we didn’t read the description of the activity too carefully—or at all.  On arrival, I overheard my husband ask, “How will we know we are at the turning point?” I didn’t linger for the answer. I was heading for the Porto Potty. I figured my husband would receive all the information we’d need.

A very nice older man drove us to the launching area. A very nice younger man set us up with a two person kayak and two life jackets. And we set off down the Miami River.

The kayaking was bliss. Blue sky. Bird song. We spotted a Great Blue Heron, my favorite. I marveled at how easy it was for my husband and I to kayak together, how adept we were at paddling, how in sync in both movement and observation. The weather was cool for the first time all summer. We wouldn’t have to worry about overheating triggering my MS symptoms. As time went on, I took off my life jacket to ensure I wouldn’t overheat. My husband started splashing my neck. We laughed. We rowed.  We saw a bridge ahead. We knew we had two bridges to cross under before the end of the route. I was getting warmer. I asked for a swig of water. Not five minutes later, I had to pee.

An observant reader may be perplexed: didn’t Ms. Lab Rat just use the Porto Potty three paragraphs ago? What’s the deal with her having to pee? Is it MS, is it old age, is it childbirth? Maybe it’s all three.

In any case, we didn’t know how much distance was left between Bridge One and the turning point. We decided we’d reached our own turning point.  It was time to head back.

As soon as we dipped in our oars, we discovered that paddling upstream would be much more rigorous than we’d imagined while paddling downstream. We briefly wondered why the kayak outfit hadn’t pointed us upstream first, to conserve our energy for the tough stuff at the end. And then we quit wondering. We had to use all of our strength to  paddle. Some areas were difficult. Others…impossible. More than once, we experienced the degradation of getting  pulled backward while paddling all-out. We carried the kayak over one rough spot. My husband got up and pulled me through others.

At one point, I had to laugh. My usual work-out ethic has been tempered by multiple warnings from eye care professionals that my left retina is strategically poised to spring out the instant I over-strain. As we paddled upstream, I overstrained aplenty. It’s a wonder that retina didn’t pop. I kept catching myself making bizarre, grotesque facial expressions, as though baring my lower teeth plus rolling my upper lip plus flaring my nostrils plus straining my neck was somehow going move the paddle any faster. I’m going to hazard a guess that my husband also had his moments of unnecessary energy expenditure, like those times he was paddling so hard, he had the boat rocking side to side. As we rocked, I felt useless. Worse than useless. Like unnecessary cargo that could easily jettison.

As we rowed back up the way we came, we passed other kayakers, all of them blissful, laid  back. All of them paddling downstream. They were playing. We were working. Distances easily crossable on foot appeared nearly impassable by kayak. We studied the current, strategized our route—hug the shore here, avoid the rocks there. Toward the end, we agreed to cut straight across the river, and row toward the far side of an island. We made better progress than we anticipated. There on the island was a gathering of Canadian Geese. Spectacular creatures. They looked mildly surprised to see us, but not at all threatened. Yep. We were too pathetic to spook a goose. And too tired to wield a cell phone and take an Instagram. Instead, we focused on rowing steadily to the launch point, trying to make it look as though we’d been rowing steadily, in unison, all along. Oddly enough, there was no one on the banks to witness our show of fortitude. Our kayak nosed onto land unheralded. The very nice younger man was nowhere to be found. My husband pulled the kayak inland alongside its mates and threw our life jackets in the pile and called the number for the kayak rental outfit. They were as surprised as we were that no one was there at the end point to meet us. They told him they’d call him back. A minute later, my husband got the phone call that explained all. Apparently, we weren’t supposed to have turned around—the kayak route went one way only. If we’d just continued paddling downstream, we would have quickly and effortlessly made it to the end. A very nice young lady drove out to pick us up at the launch point. She said, “You must have worked hard.” We needed to hear that. “We’re so sorry. We must not have communicated very well.” We needed to hear that, too.

For me, the trip was a victory. I hadn’t peed my pants. I hadn’t lost my retina. I hadn’t been jettisoned. My bar for victory is comfortably low.

On the drive home, my husband suggested I write a blog post about the kayak incident. He saw it as a perfect metaphor for how we are accustomed to working harder than every other couple, because we are constantly pushing back against MS.

I see a different metaphor. He and I should relax, and go with the flow.

p.s. A big thanks to all the readers who have voted for me in the #WEGOHealthAwards. If you haven’t yet, there’s still time. Follow this link.

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A Day in the Life at the NIH Triali

Nothing ever goes exactly as planned in the NIH. This is an observation, not a criticism. Sometimes, a change in plans works to my advantage. When my husband and I arrived promptly for my seven a.m. appointment, I was told my eight a.m. MRI would have to be rescheduled. There weren’t enough technicians. My husband and I are adept at such situations. My body’s fickle insurrections have given us plenty of exposure to the changing of plans.

My first appointment was to review the revised consent form with the magnetically charming nurse Naomi. Within five minutes chatting over the forms she’d told me enough about life in DC for me to recommend Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Americanah. As it turned out, Naomi had read that book and loved it, loved it so much she’d read it non-stop through a red-eye flight to Dubai, forgoing in-flight movies, forgoing sleep.

It was Naomi’s job to inform me that I would not be getting better care at the NIH than I could get at my local neurologist. I adore and admire my local neurologist. But I ask any of you with MS: does your neurologist have time to assess your condition for four hours? The level of care just does not compare. And more importantly, my visit to my local neurologist is designed to help only me. An NIH visit is designed to help multitudes.

Naomi told me I might be eligible to be paid $200 for my spinal tap. (There is usually no payment involved in a clinical trial, just reimbursement for food and travel.) I was open to this change of plans.

After I saw Naomi, I saw Dr. W. The last time I’d seen her, she’d been displeased by how easily she could push against my leg. She’d uttered one syllable, “weak.” I’ve been working  on my leg strength ever since. This visit, I gave her sufficient resistance. But she simply gave me a new area to work on. “You have shitty balance. You can improve that. Practice!” I’d improved my strength. You can bet I’ll improve my balance

Dr. W proposed a change of plans even more extravagant than Naomi’s $200 compensation. She noticed I’d just had a spinal tap the year before. She consulted the timelines of the studies I’m in, and declared I wouldn’t have to have a spinal tap this year, after all. This piece of news was an order of magnitude more exciting than the prospect of a spinal headache, and two hundred bucks. “I am your advocate,” she declared. We fist bumped.

Next came  the auxiliary scales. I performed the same battery of tests I always do—I did worse on some, better on others—all in all, it seemed a wash. Dr. W will be calling me next week when the data is in.

Further updates on this visit will have to wait until tomorrow. I am tired, my legs are crawling with electric pain, and my husband and I are planning to get up early and take the Metro into DC tomorrow to visit a museum.

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#WEGOHealthAwards

TRAP Reboot

My husband and I are waiting at our gate for our flight to Dulles. I’ll be back at the NIH (National Institutes of Health) tomorrow morning at 7am to start anew with the TRAP trial.
This trial is exciting, because it is trying to address the woes of those of us who are no longer deriving much benefit from MS drugs.

MS drugs are most effective when they are started very early in the disease process. Over time, their efficacy declines. While FDA approved MS drugs have varying rates of success at preventing relapses, none of them are all that great at penetrating the brain tissue, where inflammation hides. The longer you have MS, “compartmentalized inflammation” insidiously drags you down, even as your MRI shows no new lesions.

The TRAP trial is investigating four inexpensive time tested medicines to see how effectively they work to counter the stealthy decline within cells in those of us with the progressive form of the disease.

The four drugs are: Pioglitazone, Montelukast, Losartan, and Hydroxychloroquine.

The trial is testing the performance of these drugs when taken alongside standard MS drugs, so as not to abandon whatever potential benefit the standard MS drugs may confer. When I’d first signed up for the trial, I’d been on Zinbryta. When Zinbryta got pulled from the market in February, I was instructed to stop taking the supplementary medication from the trial as well. Now that I am on a steady course of Tecfidera, it can be paired with one of the four investigatory medications when I start the trial anew.

Tomorrow they will be running a battery of tests on me at the clinic. I will be interested to see if I’ve been on a plateau since I stopped taking Zinbryta and the TRAP medication, or if the plateau has been…dipping a bit. No matter what news I get, I’m going to keep running up the down escalator as fast as I can. I’m not going to passively rely on medication. My own wellness program includes: a Wahls Diet, so many supplements, mini-weight lifting, meditation, yoga, walks with the hubby and dogs, deep friendships, and meaningful work that supports others.

Which reminds me, thanks for reading this blog. And deepest thanks to those who have endorsed my nomination for Patient Leader in the #WEGOHealthAwards, as well as those who have gone so far as to link to my video. Reading your passionate testimonials makes me feel like Tom Sawyer spying on his own funeral!

I Am Creating Change By…

Endorse Me! 

There is still time to endorse my nomination as a Patient Leader for the #WEGOHealthAwards. If I were to be selected, I could extend my reach  with movers and shakers in healthcare  to advocate for people with disabilities. 

If you haven’t already, please follow this link to navigate to my nominee profile at #WEGOHealthAwards. Under my picture on the right-hand side of the page will be an “endorse” button. Clicking this button will submit an endorsement. While you are there, take a look at some of the other outstanding candidates. As I understand it, you can endorse more than one person. If you know of an outstanding patient advocate in your community, you can nominate them here.

I am so thankful to The Clifton Writing Workshop members who sat through my first improvisation of this speech. And I am beyond thankful to my friend Maria Ramos, who directed and filmed the final product. If you like this video, please share!

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