Big News

I just got a call from Dr. A, the neurologist who follows me when I participate in clinical trials at the NIH. She is always a delightful conversationalist. This time, topics ranged from the music of poet Joy Harjo to the mindfulness meditation of Dan Harris to the benefits of exercise. She asked about my Covid-19 quarantine routine, which includes yoga, pilates, qigong, breath work, short walks—and cold showers. Dr. A is one of the toughest ladies I know. But even she didn’t warm to the notion of a cold shower. Instead, she deftly switched topics to the motive for her call — would I be interested in participating in a new NIH study on the effects of diet on MS?


Would I? Of course I would.


As long term readers of this blog already know, this diet study would not be my first rodeo. I had participated in a trial conducted by Dr. Wahls which compares the efficacy of her eponymous diet to that of The Swank Diet. If you have a grain of common sense, you will not be shocked to learn that I found her study to be biased. I joined it in good faith, expressed a willingness to be assigned to either diet, and pressed on when I was assigned the less desirable Swank Diet. I kept scrupulous record of every food I ate, down to the last teaspoon. The low fat Swank Diet may have helped many people with MS, but it didn’t help me. On the last day of the study, I broke my fast with an avocado. Yum! Fat! I’ve been back to eating fats—healthy fats—ever since.


As soon I had control of my own diet back, I switched to the Wahls Diet I’d been waiting for—and I found the recipes lacking. This was a few years ago; I know Dr. Wahls has been tinkering with her diet every day since then. At the time I felt like her focus was entirely on feeding the brain, and not on delighting the palate. I despaired of convincing my family to adopt the diet along with me. While gripped with anxiety about facing a lifetime of stoic meals, I stumbled on this happy website, which is run by two unpretentious women with five autoimmune diseases between them. They call their diet the AutoImmune Protocol (AIP), and that’s the diet my husband and I have merrily adopted. I asked Dr. A if I could remain on AIP throughout the study. She asked a few questions about it to determine if it could fit within the framework of the diet the NIH would want me to adopt. At this point, she thinks it could work. I’m certainly not willing to go back to a SAD Diet (Standard American Diet) to provide a before and after. I have learned my lesson and will never again martyr my diet for science. I will, however, happily chart my progress teaspoon by the teaspoon, if it will help others make well informed decisions about changes they can implement to optimize their immune system.


Diet should never be about cults of personality. An impartial government study of diet and immunity will be beneficial to all of us with multiple sclerosis, whether our current diet is Swank, Wahls, or the sweet, generic-brand AIP. A diet study came out earlier this month which shows AIP can change gene expression. That’s big news—proof that diagnosis isn’t destiny.

This new NIH diet study is not yet official; it is still just a twinkle in a researcher’s eye. It won’t happen if our researchers can’t find NIH study participants willing to document our food intake (tedious) and swab at least one poop sample (odious). But if I know my NIH researchers, and my fellow lab rats, we will be up for the challenge.


In my experience so far, diet adjustments can be arduous and imprecise and emotional and sadly not entirely curative. I see them as necessary, but not sufficient. A new diet study, if done well, can help all of us struggling through autoimmune disease to direct our efforts toward our best possible outcome, whatever that might be.

Gentle Reader, may you be happy. Stay well!

MS Blog with Boob Pic

Ms. Lab Rat is supposed to be a blog about an intrepid gal who joins clinical trial after clinical trial, surfing on the cutting edge of multiple sclerosis research.
Ms. Lab Rat is not supposed to be a blog about an anxious gal whose left breast is on the cutting edge of a surgical scalpel. But that’s where this MS blogger will be, while The Art Academy is closed for Spring Break.
Sorry.
(I know, I know, I shouldn’t be the one saying sorry. But have you have ever met a person who did not apologize for a physical misfortune beyond their control, be it mild hearing loss, Sorry, could you repeat that?—to terminal cancer, I’m so sorry I won’t live to see my baby graduate high school. You want to say: I’m the one who’s sorry.)
In this case, Gentle Reader, you needn’t be sorry for Ms. Lab Rat—yet. I have health insurance. (Thanks, husband.) I have a support system in place. (Thanks husband/family/friends.) And I don’t have cancer. (As far as the pathologists can tell.)
What I do have are a few cells that kind of look like they could turn into cancer…or look like the type of cells that tend to hang out with cancer cells. The pathologists couldn’t really agree on what to make of these suspicious cells. Which was why it took them a week, and not the promised one to three days, to call me.
As it happened, I got this call just two hours after I’d learned I have severe osteoporosis, and just a half an hour before I was scheduled to teach Artist as Reader. I was in the middle of an enormous copy job, which involved making 17 two-sided copies of the 92 page screenplay of Get Out. The call made me laugh. Two bad health updates in two hours? Who gets that? It seemed too bad to be true. My biggest fear remained the complicated copy job. I really really hate copier jams, especially so close to class time. Trivial frustrations like that are somehow harder for me to take then even super grim news. The printer didn’t jam. I was genuinely relieved, and genuinely curious to see what my students would think of the manuscript. I couldn’t be bothered to update my blog post about my osteoporosis diagnosis with a dramatic PS. I had a class to teach. Besides, my mom reads my blog. (Hi, Mom!) I didn’t want to worry her.
I am now scheduled for a third biopsy, a surgical excision that will scoop out the entire perplexing nodule and resolve any unanswered question. I’ll be glad to be rid of the uncertainty. I’m not yet skilled at living with anxiety. Last night, I had a hard time getting back to sleep after my 4th or 5th fourth trip to the bathroom (thank you, MS bladder.) I tried meditation after meditation, but stayed awake from 2am to almost 4. (I fell asleep just fine after trips seven and six.) OK, maybe it’s time to botox the old bladder again. Do you see how living with MS is in itself a full time job?
I was grateful to have yoga today, to help me unwind and expand, physically and mentally. As I had hoped, I was not the only student at this week’s class for yoga with MS and Parkinson’s. I met two intelligent, ambitious women there, an accomplished artist and an accomplished writer, and best of all, I got to catch up with my buddy Monica. We lingered over our Wahls-compliant lunches to chat about breast biopsies, and so much more. In a few short weeks, we’ll have matching scars.
It seems no MS story is as simple as just one diagnosis. At least, not for those of us lucky enough to be living decades with MS—long enough to encounter the usual trials of mere aging. Maybe Ms. Lab Rat is a typical MS blog, after all.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.